naked girls

Empowered Naked Women Bare All On Health & Body-Love

A woman perceives her body in different ways, and that, a healthy body translates into something unique to one’s lifestyle and background.

In 2019, Women’s Health conducted a study, as part of its ‘Project Body Love’ campaign, which, unfortunately, uncovered that 75% of British women do not feel confident about their own bodies. In fact, most women were averse to their own bodies.

Although some of them appeared flawless, deep inside they harbor negative emotions such as insecurity and awkwardness toward their own naked forms. Most women we’ve encountered actually feel that nakedness is not a place of comfort or freedom.

So, in a call to celebrate the feminine physique for its uniqueness in beauty, power, and strength, Women’s Health magazine launched its ‘naked women’ series, which debuted in its 2014 issue.

The main cover featured the gloriously nude Zoe Saldana joined by Trainer Tracy Anderson and Reality Actress Millie Mackintosh in the inner pages.

This was succeeded in 2016, with American Actress Lea Michele, British Model Iskra Lawrence, and Nutritional Therapist Madeleine Shaw heeding the ‘Project Body Love’ campaign shoutout.

In 2017, American Actress and Dancer Jenna Dewan agreed to pose nude on the cover as a sign of support to the ‘Project Body Love’ campaign, joined by English Singer-Songwriter Alexandra Burke and English TV & Radio Presenter Melanie Sykes who also stripped down in the featured article.

In September of 2019, English Singer and TV Presenter Rochelle Humes jumped in on the body-love movement by appearing on Women’s Health main cover together with buffed up professional climbers, and football and rugby players.

In celebration of these brave and beautiful naked women who have come to accept, love, and celebrate their own unique forms and shapes, WH has collected all 40 images of them plus their notable quotes from the magazine’s past four issues.

Based on the testimonies of these following 40 women, one comes to believe that health does not equate to any particular shape or form, but is, in fact, a lifestyle.